Tag Archives: roof

How to cut your electric bill in half part 2  free ideas DIY by Missouri Wind and Solar

**How to cut your electric bill in half part 2 free ideas DIY by Missouri Wind and Solar**



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Link to Part 3 How To Cut Your Electric Bill In Half MISSOURI WIND AND SOLAR WEBSITE …

Roof Dormer Costs - Building Design Money Saving Tips

**Roof Dormer Costs – Building Design Money Saving Tips**



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Click on this link to learn more about construction architecture and home building. Watch this video to find a few different ways to cut building costs and save a few dollars, while designing a new building. I realize that some things look great and really at a lot of character to a building, but these things also increase your financial burden, especially if you’re the owner. If you’re looking for a few more tips about home design or construction, visit the few of our other websites and watch a few more of our videos.
here's another architectural design money saving tip that you should be aware of if you're building or remodeling and what we're looking at here is a roof dormer and they could be costly the building you're looking at here has about 20 of them on the roofs and it's a commercial property of course a little shopping mall and they look great I have to say that they do look nice but people are still going to come to this to the shop and they're still gonna buy stuff whether these things are on the roofs or not but you as the Builder need to realize a few things and then of course is these things can be costly I would imagine that the bare minimum you could that you could build something like this for it would be about a thousand dollars but I would imagine that's the minimum minimum probably more like between three and five thousand dollars to build one of these now like I said this thing has about 20 of them on there you're looking at between forty and sixty thousand dollars to build these things then that money can be used elsewhere or could actually go into your pockets so if you're a builder try to point this out to the designer or the architect do we really need these things on there and if you're an architect or designer make it aware to the property owner that these things are going to add a couple extra bucks to the building and so again just want to give you guys an idea when you're designing a building or planning on building a building maybe you're gonna build your own building things like these cost money and realistically if you don't need them you want to save a couple bucks get rid of them I mean let's face it people are still going to come and shop at the stores or visit your building with or without these on the roof another thing is – sometimes these things can create roof leaks which eventually are going to add to your roof repair bills in the future

Saving Money with Your Home Landscape

**Saving Money with Your Home Landscape**



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Here’s how the landscape outside your home can lower energy use and utility bills on the inside. From our sustainable landscapes series, see how smart tree placement and green roofs and walls dramatically improve energy efficiency. Learn more at www.asla.org/sustainablelandscapes.
traditional suburban development has resulted in rows of single-family homes on large bear Lots with few trees these Lots exacerbate the energy inefficiency practices found within homes while homeowners can take simple low-cost steps to make the inside of their homes better insulated and more energy efficient few know that the landscape can be part of the solution landscape architect's use basic green technologies like smart tree placement and green roofs to help make homes energy-efficient tree placement can have a significant impact on indoor temperatures and energy use large trees should be planted on the west east and south west sides of a home exact tree placement depends on the size of the house and lot during spring and summer strategically placed trees provide shade reducing temperatures by between 20 and 45 degrees if the home has an air conditioning unit tree shade can help it run more efficiently in hotter months paths of summer shade can also keep parking lots and paved areas cool reducing ambient heat in the fallen winter deciduous trees shed their leaves allowing a home to receive more direct sunlight and absorb more heat reducing energy needs homes that are exposed to direct winds during the winter use more energy to keep the inside warm natural wind breaks can be created with rows of tall trees and dense bushes planted perpendicular to the wind direction evergreens which keep their leaves year-round can be planted to the north and northwest of the house creating a powerful wind break even residential homes can add low-cost yet well designed green roofs green roofs can provide insulation keeping a home cool in the summer and warm in the winter the US Environmental Protection Agency says a typical two to three story building can experience 15 to 25 percent savings in summertime energy costs another alternative is green walls green walls are constructive trellis like structures that enable plants to grow vertically placed on the side of a home driveway or patio these structures can reduce the ambient air temperature by up to 10 degrees subsidies and rebates can help homeowners install solar panels which help reduce energy needs and costs over the long term in the northern hemisphere solar panels are installed to face south and work best if there's no tree shade covering them on homes that already have solar trees can be planted to avoid casting shadows on the panels today strategic tree placement and green roofs and walls provide benefits which aren't often used in a residential context this is unfortunate as their benefits go way beyond energy savings higher energy efficiency means less carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere trees and green roofs also act as carbon sinks they absorb co2 they also create oxygen which they release back into the atmosphere these systems create healthier environments for both communities and ecosystems not least of all trees help us create beautiful and comfortable environments in which to work play and live

How to cut your electric bill in half part 4 water saving By Missouri Wind and Solar

**How to cut your electric bill in half part 4 water saving By Missouri Wind and Solar**



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MISSOURI WIND AND SOLAR WEBSITE

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WHERE WE’RE LOCATED:
332 Cobblestone Drive
Seymour, Mo. 65746

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EMAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 1-417-708-5359

WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT:
Missouri Wind and Solar offers a service no other DIY wind and solar company does – system design, installation advice, and detailed personal diagrams on how to wire the system together. You’re not blindly purchasing products you *think* you might need, you’re getting true customer and technical support before and after the sale.

How To Cut Your Electric Bill In Half Free Ideas part 3 Clothes Dryer | Missouri Wind and Solar

**How To Cut Your Electric Bill In Half Free Ideas part 3 Clothes Dryer | Missouri Wind and Solar**



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This video shows you how to heat your home using wasted heat.
Heat and Cool your home for FREE using a clothes dryer

Missouri Wind And Solar website
The humidity level in your home should be 55 to 60 percent. If your humidity in the winter months is lower then that then the lint bucket will help to bring that humidity level up. If where you live the humidity is already higher then 60 percent in the winter months then this bucket will not work for you.
There has never been any MOLD issue since people have been using this type of lint bucket since the 1980’s.

See the step-by-step DIY Tutorial here:

MISSOURI WIND AND SOLAR WEBSITE

SOCIAL MEDIA:
FACEBOOK:
INSTAGRAM:
PINTEREST:
LINKEDIN:
YELP:

WHERE WE’RE LOCATED:
332 Cobblestone Drive
Seymour, Mo. 65746

HOW TO CONTACT US:
EMAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 1-417-708-5359

WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT:
Missouri Wind and Solar offers a service no other DIY wind and solar company does – system design, installation advice, and detailed personal diagrams on how to wire the system together. You’re not blindly purchasing products you *think* you might need, you’re getting true customer and technical support before and after the sale.
Hi everybody, I'm Jeff and I want to show
you how to make your own dryer lint bucket to help heat your home with your clothes dryer.
This is not for gas clothes dryers, this is for electric clothes dryers only. You can't
pump the exhaust from a gas dryer into your house, it'd create carbon monoxide. So, this
is for electric dryers only. So you need humidity in the air in your house
in the winter. You'll be able to turn your thermostat down a little bit if you can get
the humidity in your house to about 55 percent. The humidity will hold the heat in the air,
so when, say, your furnace shuts off it doesn't get cold and drafty really quick if there's
humidity in the air. You've got that humidity and it'll hold the heat. Anyway, what they have on the market now are these
small dryer vent buckets, I'm sure you've seen them, they're about this square and they've
got a place to put your dryer vent hose in the top and you fill them about half full
of water. Well, those things are just junk, okay. They don't work, they just throw out
more lint into the room than you can imagine, plus the water that you put into the bucket
evaporates very quickly and the next thing you know, it's tipping over on you. So, what I've done is made a large version
of that. I've done this a long time ago, back in the 1980's, so this isn't anything new
and I'm sure there are other people out there who have made this, but this is very inexpensive
to do. I just went to Home Depot and bought a five
gallon pail and I bought there lid, it was about four bucks for this. Another thing I
bought is what's called a dryer dock and what it is is for four inch vent pipe for dryer
vent pipe and I'll show you the side of it. Giving it a twist unlocks it. Okay, and we're
going to use this for something different. Then, I got two hose clamps and I got the
aluminum dryer venting hose. This is eight feet worth and that's all you need. This didn't cost me very much to get all of
these. So I'm going to show you how this works. Now, you can make this really quick and it
will cost you probably less than buying one of those little junky boxes for lint. And,
there's a couple of other things you do not want to do with an electric dryer. I used
to be an appliance repair man for like 25 years. Never take a nylon and put over the
exhaust pipe on a dryer and clamp it down to let heat into your house; what happens
is that nylon will fill with lint very quickly and instead it'll slow down the airflow coming
out of your dryer. So, say it used to take you a half hour to dry clothes and now you've
got this nylon sock over the exhaust pipe on the dryer and now, all of a sudden, it's
taking 45 minutes to dry your clothes, and then it's taking an hour to dry your clothes.
Well, what's happened is those nylon stockings are slowing down the airflow of the exhaust
coming out of the dryer and basically backing up all of the humidity inside of the dryer.
But, it's a bad idea. Don't ever use nylon, you cannot slow down the airflow, the exhaust,
out of any dryer. If you do, you will increase the time it takes to dry a load of clothes.
They have another little deal that fits into your exhaust pipe, it's a plastic tube like
this, a square box, and a tiny screen on the front and you flip it this way for the wintertime
and it blows the heat into your house. Those don't really work very well, the screen in
them fills up with lint right away and it's a waste of time. So, I've come up with this and I've done this
back in the 1980's and I don't know if anyone else has done it, it's just something I came
up with myself. So, I'll show you how you're gonna start.
It's really easy. This quick connect, or this dryer dock, this goes into the top of the
bucket. All you've got to do is take yourself a felt marker and go to the center of the
bucket. I'm using really simple tools, too. Just a flat black felt marker, there, and
I've got my hole. Alright, now next what I've got is my box
cutter. This is a nice little Gerber box cutter I've got, this thing is cool, you'd like one
of these. I open up boxes all the time, so I've got one it's a little clip. So, anyway,
just use a utility knife, a drywall knife, or a sabre saw to go down here and cut this
out. Anyway, I'm going to cut this out and I'll put in the dryer dock. Okay, so this is how it looks. This is a little
easier than what I did. You're gonna pop it apart and there are three screw holes in the
top of this which is pretty cool. All I'm going to do is, I have three self tapping
screws, and I'm going to screw down into this and that'll be it. You don't want to screw these things down
very tight or it'll strip it out. There you go, I've got 'er screwed in. The other piece
locks on there, bang, locked in. Now you can put your dryer vent hose right to the top
of this. Now, for the exhaust, this is what I did. Okay, so now what I need to do is cut
a whole bunch of vent holes around the outside edge of this bucket and this is very important.
We need a lot of air flow coming around the outside edge of this bucket. I've got a 15/16
inch wood bit but you can use a bigger one, just don't go any smaller than this. And remember, don't put too few because you
will slow down the exhaust on your dryer and it's going to take you a lot longer to dry
your clothes, so, put in plenty. There you go, just put one at each one of these little
ridges and now I'll go ahead and drill it out. There we go, we're all done. That's plenty
of exhaust. Now, what we're going to do is, pretty much we're almost done, just attach
the hose to the back of the dryer and we're ready to go. Now, the hose I'm using is this aluminum dryer
vent hose. This is 4 inch stuff in aluminum. Don't use that white vinyl hose if you've
got it around, as a matter of fact, that stuff is banned in a lot of places because it catches
on fire, so they use this aluminum stuff. This is eight feet worth. So, and I've bought my two four inch clamps
and, truthfully, I've probably got about twenty bucks into this altogether. All of this stuff
just comes from Home Depot. Okay, there you go. I've got my hose attached
to the bucket, you want to make sure it's nice and tight like that and then, we can
unlock it from the bucket. We'll go ahead and hook this up to the dryer. Okay, we've got the other end hooked onto
the exhaust to the dryer and it's nice if you can put this vent bucket out in another
room away from the dryer, but if you can't, you can't. Okay, now there is one more thing I have left
to do. There are several tabs on the top of this bucket and that makes it kind of hard
to unsnap and get it off. So, what I'll do is cut out every other one of these tabs and
it makes it easy to unlock it. Okay, you see what I did? I cut off every
other locking tab off from this so it's easy to take off. Now, all you do is fill this
bucket half full of water, just halfway up. Snap the lid on, use the dryer dock. Locked
on and we're all done, just turn your dryer on and dry like you normally do. All of the
lint will blow down into the water and get trapped and it won't come out into your room.
Remember, don't do this with a gas dryer, you can get carbon monoxide poisoning if you
do that. You don't ever exhaust a gas dryer into your house. This is for electric dryers
only. Now, you'll want to check the water once in
awhile and keep the bucket about half full. When it starts getting all sorta nasty and
full of lint, just pop the ring off, pop the lid off, take it out and dump it outdoors
or wherever you want to dump it. Anyway, this is part of my series on How to Cut Your Electric
Bill in Half and this here will definitely keep your furnace from running so much, you
might as well pump the heat into your house. Plus, this is going to bring a lot of humidity
into your house in the wintertime. Now, you don't want to use this in the summertime. Anyway, that's all there is to it and I'm
Jeff and this another part of my series on How to Cut Your Electric Bill in Half and
I will show you how to heat and cool your home with an electric dryer.