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NBC TODAY: Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis - www.NBCUniversalArchives.com

**NBC TODAY: Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis – www.NBCUniversalArchives.com**



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In June of 1956 the TODAY show broadcast its program from the 500 Club in Atlantic City. Guests included the hilarious comedy duo of Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. We recently uncovered some of these laughs and wanted to share them for our Video of the Week.

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Chicago Gun Violence: How Some Teens Are Learning To Save Lives | NBC News

**Chicago Gun Violence: How Some Teens Are Learning To Save Lives | NBC News**



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Activism is helping the youth cope with violence in the South and West sides of Chicago. The youth-led anti-violence organization, Good Kids Mad City teaches teens how to act as first responders to gun violence that may happen right in front of them and Future Ties is an after-school program that teaches survival skills to kids as young as six years old.
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Chicago Gun Violence: How Some Teens Are Learning To Save Lives | NBC News
Somebody got shot. Timer starts now. What do I do first?
Timer starts now. What do I do first? Analyze him, analyze him. You said he was shot where? I need an ambulance, she's been
shot in her leg, she's bleeding out. They won't stop the violence like, They always kill people, they never stop. They just keep going on and on. In Chicago, young people
aren't able to be young people. Walking around with PTSD,
learning how to treat gunshot wounds. These are things that soldiers
are being trained on in the war. When my brother got shot,
it had a heavy impact on my life. Not growing up without one
of my big brothers is hard. One day I was playing outside with
my friends, they just started shooting, it almost hit me but I ducked down, then
we have to run in the house, I was scared. I hold pressure or her neck because
how long does it take to bleed out? Five to seven minutes. Does everybody know how
to find someone's pulse? Yeah.
Chicago, you think, okay, that's just normal and
it shouldn't be normal. Chicago is a tale of two cities. On one side, the tourist attraction
that many knows downtown Chicago
Chicago is a tale of two cities. On one side, the tourist attraction
that many knows downtown Chicago from the Riverwalk to Navy piers. And then there's the other
side of Chicago. I grew up on the south side of Chicago
where many lives are lost because of the lack of support and resources. Last 72 hours in Chicago,
52 shot and ten killed. At least 38 people were shot,
seven of those victims have died. Dozens of shots fired just down
the street from an elementary school. People feel like they
have no other options. So that's why we started GoodKids MadCity
as an urban movement to provide resources for young people who might be dealing
with violence in their communities. What this fight means to me! And what's something over
the last year that you're proud of? With GoodKids MadCity? Yeah, something that you
whatever you were a part of or anything like that. The Africa trip, man. That and the sugar boy. Sugar boy. Man.
When we started the group, basically after Parkland happened, then we
had a lot of young people who were scared because when these mass shootings happen
in these predominantly white communities, they get counselors, trauma services,
and at the same time, our state is calling out for us to have
more police officers in our schools. And these are things that
are criminalizing, killing us and we need something different. And we were able to meet
with Parkland students. And it was a powerful moment for
those students to say, this is the most traumatic thing
I've ever dealt with in my life. I've never been through
anything like this before. I got people to say, yeah, we understand
that we deal with this on a daily basis. I'm basically, like a mentor and ally, an
organizer to help guide the young people and their vision for what is that they
wanna address and bring to the community. How many people here lost a loved
one to violence under the age of 21? The climate of the city, this that
we're fighting is, right, violence, and we're fighting for
how has it affected you personally. Lost our cousin, he was running
away from home when he was nine and he got caught and he got shot,
I forgot how many times. I don't want other families going through
the same thing that we went through. I lost my brother to gun violence. Last night 19-year-old Delmonte Johnson
was just outside his brother's basketball practice when CPD says someone inside
a tan color vehicle fatally shot him in the chest and stomach. Every time you turn around mamas is
crying, mamas is crying for their babies. I actually found out because I was
walking to one of the stores when the store, he got killed by was down
the street from where I was at. Then I actually heard the gun shots. One of my other brothers
was there when he got shot. He really couldn't talk much
because he was traumatized. It hurt me so much that he was laying
in my hands, but he's still with me. He's still with me to this day. I had just had a training for
young people on how to treat gunshot wounds. They taught them how to stop the bleeding,
what to do when waiting for the ambulance to arrive. And then his brother came to me and
say, I wish I had came that day. Understand that for some people
the difference between having somewhere to be and being standing outside is
the difference between life and death. This is my neighborhood I was born and raised, it's not really safe around. We hear gunshots almost every day, every day. Hearing it broadcast on the news a lot, knowing that
is close to my area basically makes me go outside like, oh is this going to
happen to me if I walk outside? At the age of 18 I was shot at my
community and it was broad daylight. That was the last time I
walked in my community for a long time because I was scared. Every time I heard a car stop, every time
I heard footsteps too close I panicked and that's something that you have
to deal with on a daily basis, being afraid to walk
through that community. When I had to do this stuff myself, it didn't really like sound like nothing,
right? When everybody in the room
we did it together, we made a whole thunderstorm in the room,
boom. Once I realized that, the more people we
get to join not whether we can make us- In Chicago, you need to know what
different gangs are where, I had to walk through plenty of
gangs just to get to school. I know this block is full with them,
I know this block is full with them So you know what?
I'm gonna just take the long way even though I'm gonna be late,
okay I'm gonna be late to school but at least I'll be safe.
though I'm gonna be late,
okay I'm gonna be late to school but at least I'll be safe. And then you get to school, they manage if
you've got a tendency for being late but you're just trying to be safe. Tell her we're coming
around the corner. We're coming around the corner. Your mom said hi. I know,
I see her car out here, hey mom. Hey mom. They say, hey mom. We're headed to our
first responders training. Part one of to teach you how to what to do in a situation where
someone is bleeding out, and how to potentially save their lives
while waiting for help to arrive. For us, GoodKids MadCity, our solution is giving people
what they need to survive. If we have job opportunities,
real job opportunities, with a livable wage,
you wouldn't have folks out here stealing, you wouldn't have folks out
here robbing each other. Hurt people hurt people,
healed people heal people. I really commend just
you all even leading, just trying learning this skill that
they're teaching soldiers in Iraq, how to save somebody's life when they're
bleeding out, you know what I'm saying. For Dareon, you especially, I appreciate
you even being here in this space. You all went through this six months ago. I just wanna go and give you guys
the opportunity to say why learning how to treat a gunshot wound
is important to you guys. I might have the situation where
I'm on the sidewalk with a friend, and that friend might get shot or
I might get and I know how to do it. I was eighteen when I
was actually shot, and most of the friend who were with me in
the moment were around the same age. None of us knew that so the fact that it's now being
given to youth is very important. You said you were shot where? In my left shoulder and right leg. Is that two inches above her wound? This is Parkway Garden apartments here. This is the complex where
Michelle Obama grew up. Many of the kids in the community
have to grow up faster because of the situations
that surround them. Future Ties is an after school program inside of Parkway Garden. Couple of the survival skills that we try to put in place at Future Ties for
one is the meditation. Yoga, conflict circles,
but this is like therapy for them to make sure that
they are mentally stable. Well, you're not really protected
because it's very harmful and you gotta watch out what you're doing. Yeah, I have, my mama was waking us up. She was telling us not to get by the
window or nothing cuz it was gunshots and again it was going back and forth Office of community affairs, this is officer Maddox,
how can I help you? Currently I am an active police officer. I've been with the force now,
it will be 23 years in May. There's a lot of distrust
between the police and the community because they
are fearful of each other. So it's not just a police problem,
it's not just a community problem. Knowing your rights. So can anybody give me an idea of what
that kinda means to know your rights? Yeah. It's to know is to be able
to get out of trouble you say? We talk about what to do if you
are stopped or detained by the police. So they need to know what their rights
are, especially until their parent comes to the police station or the attorney
shows up at the police station. The last you come across the police
who isn't like how most police should be like, they're not friendly and
they don't like this, young people say it. The officers that take us to the
station don't let us use the bathroom or get some water. When we do these trainings, we don't
want you guys to be fearful of the police, that's not what this is about. As long as we're serving our future
leaders in this space, it takes the ties within the community to making sure
that our young people are succesful. I'm always hopeful, or I wouldn't be here. I think there's still a lot of
work that still needs to be done. They're like soldiers to me, they get
through most that many probably couldn't. Like me growing up what
you think you need to know, is need to learn how to write,
you need to learn how to read, you need to learn how to do math, and
I don't know things is what you think of never once crossed your mind and
what you need is this right? So what you're gonna wanna
do is if you can't find a pulse, or if what you're gonna wanna do is CPR. You're gonna take both of your hands and
you're going to interlock them, just like this. Cuz one of my brothers
actually got shot, and my other brother was right there. The one that was right there when he get
shot could have actually helped saved his life from the gunshot wound,
I know how to treat a gunshot wound. Now that I know this training,
I could teach them this training in case somebody just
decides to just come shoot. And then one of us gets shot, and
then they can know what to do and not gonna know what to do to
help the person that got shot.
And then one of us gets shot, and
then they can know what to do and not gonna know what to do to
help the person that got shot. Instead of just dying on the scene. It felt good because I wish I would have learned it in earlier years so
I could be able to save my cousin. But I learned it now so if something
happens to a person I'm close to or if I don't know them,
I could be able to help them. Timer starts now. What do I do first?
Timer starts now. What do I do first? Need to hide, try and take cover. You need to check yourself. Okay.
You need to see if he's conscious. Okay. See where he's shot at. Okay.
Apply pressure. And try to stop the blood by
applying pressure to the wound. Okay. And you call first responders. You just saved somebody there, bro!

How To Save Money And Spend Guilt-Free With Ramit Sethi | Better | NBC News

**How To Save Money And Spend Guilt-Free With Ramit Sethi | Better | NBC News**



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Here’s how to hit your savings goals while still spending guilt-free, according to Ramit Sethi, bestselling author of “I Will Teach You to Be Rich.”
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How To Save Money And Spend Guilt-Free With Ramit Sethi | Better | NBC News
no I'm not gonna tell you to keep a budget you don't need to most budgets are backwards looking you're looking at what you spend in the last month you're probably feeling guilty about it I have a different approach instead of looking backwards I want to look forward I want to think about where my money should go I want to set up the systems to automatically make it happen and then I want to live my life guilt-free and spend extravagantly on the things I love as long as I cut costs mercilessly all the things I don't I call this a conscious spending plan all of us have different things that we intuitively love spending money on some people want to have a beautiful apartment or a really nice car other people want to travel one month a year all of these things are totally valid but we all choose our own rich life here's a really simple way to look at where your money should be going 50 to 60 percent of your take-home money should generally be going to fixed costs these are things like your rent your mortgage your utilities at a minimum 10 percent should be going to investments these are long-term retirement investments next is short-term savings goals this is where five to ten percent of your money will go and these are things like saving for a down payment on a house gifts or a vacation and finally this is my favorite part twenty to thirty five percent goes to guilt-free spending this is eating out at restaurants buying new clothes taking your friends or family out with you on vacation whatever you want for your rich life that's where this money goes so I gave you these rules of thumb how do you create your conscious spending plan well I want to introduce something called the think want do technique just take a blank piece of paper and write down how much you think you are spending in each of these categories write down how much you want to spend in these categories and then the third part is to find out how much you actually do spend in these categories so take a look at your spending over the last 30 days find out how much money is going to your fixed costs versus your investments savings and finally guilt-free spending and now you are going to know what type of changes you need to make to flow the money for your conscious spending plan don't apologize if you have something you absolutely spending on use your guilt-free spending to unapologetically pay for the things you love but make sure that the rest of your conscious spending plan is hitting those numbers after you've done this exercise you might find that you're overspending in a couple of areas that you want to cut back down that's totally normal for me it's travel and clothes so narrow it down there try to make your changes to those big areas and don't worry about all the other stuff you can tackle that stuff later one way you can do this is to use the envelope method the envelope method can literally beat physical envelopes that you fill with cash at the beginning of a month and you say this is my guilt-free spending money once it's gone it's gone that will train you on how to correct your spending behavior you can also do this virtually through checking accounts and debit cards whatever you choose just remember to pick those couple of areas that you really want to target and cut your spending gradual imagine waking up in the morning knowing that your money is going where you want it to go and the money that you have available to you is guilt-free a conscious spending plan allows you to create your rich life and to never have to apologize for spending on the things you love hey NBC News viewers thanks for checking out our YouTube channel subscribe by clicking on that button down here and click on any of the videos over here to watch the latest interviews show highlights and digital exclusives thanks for watching

Getting Ahead Of Alzheimer’s: Young People Look To Protect Brain Health | TODAY

**Getting Ahead Of Alzheimer’s: Young People Look To Protect Brain Health | TODAY**



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New research suggests that Alzheimer’s disease may start developing at a younger age, and young people, including actor Seth Rogen and wife Lauren, are taking action. NBC’s Maria Shriver takes a closer look at the science and the millennials making changes to their lifestyles.
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#Alzheimers #SethRogen #TodayShow

Getting Ahead Of Alzheimer’s: Young People Look To Protect Brain Health | TODAY
this is the new face of fighting Alzheimer's young people in their 20s and 30s even famous Millennials like funny man Seth Rogen if you start seeing the signs of Alzheimer's in your 60s you're actually starting to develop it in your mid-30s the actor is now part of a new study on educating teens about Alzheimer's that's why we need your money Seth and his wife Lauren also created the Alzheimer's fundraiser hilarity for charity after her mother was diagnosed with the disease illnesses of the brain are heavily stigmatized and people just don't like talking about what we try to do with Larry for charity is to D stigmatize it to make it part of the conversation to make it fun and friendly to take care of your brain as a young person in fact more and more young people are making radical changes to their lifestyles now so they won't get Alzheimer's decades later comprehensive new research out this week suggests habits like a healthy diet regular exercise and brain stimulation may dramatically reduce Alzheimer's risk in older age in some cases by up to 60% the three of you you're all in your 20s and 30s when you go out with your friends is brain health on the table No so max Lugo vir decided to do something about it after his mom was diagnosed with dementia he started looking up research about how to reduce his own risk last year he wrote a best-selling book about diet in the brain and now uses Instagram to teach young people brain healthy habits like eating foods high in antioxidants and good fats avoiding processed carbs and sugars doing regular high-intensity workouts and pushing your brain with exercises like learning a new instrument you say you want to make dementia sexy that's your focus rather than writing the dementia prevention book I called my book geniuses because who doesn't want to be more genius in their everyday life I knew that if I was going to call it the dementia prevention book Millennials weren't going to buy it to educate his peers Nihao Satyadev started a non-profit in college called the youth movement against alzheimer's in addition to working out and eating right he meditates every day to reduce stress and tries to get eight hours of sleep a night all habits linked to better brain health lifestyle really has to be viewed as a medicine in NF itself and making these changes can have an immediate impact on how you feel I am a completely different person than what I was just a thin student Cristina Tehama used to diet all the time leaving her feeling cloudy and exhausted were you starving yourself and then hence starving your brain yes I was comparing myself to those girls around me and I wasn't eating enough once I started to eat again my anxiety went away my depression went away and I'm performing much better than I ever have throughout my entire life these young Trailblazers with an urgent message start protecting your brain now before it's too late when you're in your 20s I get it the last thing you want to think about is what is my health going to be like in my 50s and 60s lead a more brain healthy lifestyle now you will also feel better and probably just be happier for longer what a great message that what a great movement to Maria here's the thing though for folks like us like above 20 or 30 healthy habits can they still potentially help reduce the risk absolutely doctors and researchers say it's never too late to start fighting for your brain and caring for it and another big thing is social engagement interacting with people who make you happy interacting with a purpose a sense of purpose so actually getting up at like 3:30 this morning coming here interacting with everybody here this whole village to do this together you guys good for my brain this morning – thank you so much you

Direct Primary Care: A Better Way To Pay For Healthcare? | NBC Nightly News

**Direct Primary Care: A Better Way To Pay For Healthcare? | NBC Nightly News**



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This kind of primary care allows patients to bypass insurance and pay a flat rate to see their doctor for basic services.
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Direct Primary Care: A Better Way To Pay For Healthcare? | NBC Nightly News
NBC'S KRISTEN SHOWS US
HOW IT WORKS.
>> Reporter: WHEN JENNA NELSON TAKES HER
SONS TO THE DOCTOR,
SHE DOESN'T WORRY ABOUT FEELING RUSHED.
>> HE TAKES AS MUCH
TIME AS HE NEEDS, 30, 45 MINUTES IF NEEDED.
>> Reporter: A BIG
REASON SHE OPTED FOR SOMETHING CALLED
DIRECT PRIMARY CARE
INSTEAD OF TRADITIONAL INSURANCE.
IT'S A MEMBERSHIP OF
SORTS. UNLIMITED VISITS WITH
DR. DAVID CUNNINGHAM
FOR A MONTHLY FLAT FEE.
SHE CAN TEXT OR CALL
ANY TIME, WHICH CAN BE OFTEN WITH A
2-YEAR-OLD PRONE TO
EAR INFECTIONS AND A 4-YEAR-OLD WITH
ASTHMA.
WHAT DOES IT FEEL LIKE WHEN YOU HAVE ASTHMA?
>> TIGHT.
>> Reporter: THE FEE IS TYPICALLY BETWEEN
25 AND $85 A MONTH,
DEPENDING ON YOUR AGE FOR UNLIMITED VISITS,
ROUTINE LAB TESTS AND
SOME PLANS EVEN COVER PRESCRIPTIONS.
JENNA'S FAMILY SAVES
$500 A MONTH WITH DIRECT PRIMARY CARE
AND A LESS EXPENSIVE
HIGH-DEDUCTIBLE PLAN FOR OTHER MEDICAL
EXPENSES.
DR. CUNNINGHAM LEFT A TRADITIONAL PRACTICE.
HE SEES FEWER PATIENTS
AND MAKES LESS MONEY, BUT SAYS IT'S WORTH IT
TO AVOID INSURANCE
COMPANIES DICTATING HOW HE TREATS
PATIENTS.
>> IT FEELS GREAT TO BE PRACTICING MEDICINE
THE WAY IT'S SUPPOSED
TO BE. >> Reporter: CRITICS
WARN THERE IS IS
ALREADY A SHORTAGE OF PRIMARY CARE DOCTORS
AND DIRECT PRIMARY
CARE DOES NOT COVER SPECIALISTS OR
HOSPITAL STAYS.
>> THAT LEAVES THIS WHOLE MID RANGE OF
HEALTH PROBLEMS THAT
REALLY CAN'T BE ADDRESSED IN EVEN THE
BEST OF PRIMARY CARE
PHYSICIANS AND HE HASN'T QUITE REACHED
THE THRESHOLD FOR
CATASTROPHIC INSURANCE.
>> Reporter: FOR THE
NELSONS, DIRECT PRIMARY CARE IS THE
ANSWER TO SAVE MONEY
AND HAVE A DOCTOR WHO IS